Thursday, February 18, 2010

Lessons Children Teach Us

It's often been said that our children can teach us lessons.

There have been many instances with my daughter Sarah where she truly shows me what it's like to be a kid with no fear, pure interest and constant play. When it snows, which she loves, she wants to walk every where and cover as much snow with her boots as possible. If there is not much snow on the ground, she will find it and walk right into it. For her, the higher and steeper the snow, the better it is to play. And for her, the more fun it is.

The same goes for puddles. I know, I know. We all know a kid loves a good puddle to jump in. But really, watching your own dive in and really get in a good splash and watch them giggle is priceless, and fun to watch. Guess what. It's fun as an adult too. Jumping in the puddles with her just made her, and me, laugh harder.

Our children teach us many lessons on a regular basis. For me, Sarah has taught me much about incredibly unconditional love, patience, understanding and trust, amongst many, many others. On a more fun note, her biggest lesson has been about play. She truly is a happy child who loves life and loves to play and get messy, as many of you have seen from past photos on this blog, or from knowing her. She sometimes plays with reckless abandon, which makes me nervous. Other times, her play is so pure you can't help but want to be involved as much as possible.

This week at the gym after lifting weights I decided instead of hopping on a treadmill or the elliptical machine, which I don't really like anyway, I found an open room with a mirror, raised the volume on my headphones and danced for just about an hour. I had fun with no parameters, no boundaries...just pure unadulterated play.

So, the fun lesson this week from my little one to you is...play. Play much. Play often. Dance. Jump in a puddle. Fall in the snow. Throw a snowball. Sing in the rain. Just have fun when you can. Make requests of you and others -- reasonable and unreasonable -- and the outcomes can be tremendously rewarding.

No comments:

Post a Comment